The Team

MBRRACE-UK is being led from the National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit (NPEU) at the University of Oxford by Prof Jenny Kurinczuk and will build on existing research programmes, including the UK Obstetric Surveillance System (UKOSS) led by Prof Marian Knight at the NPEU, and The Infant Mortality and Morbidity Studies (TIMMS) led by Profs Elizabeth Draper and David Field at the University of Leicester.

Oxford Contact details

Leicester contact details

MBRRACE-UK collaborators

The MBRRACE-UK collaboration consists of researchers and clinicians from the following organisations:

Collaboration Organisations

The National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit (NPEU) is a research unit at the University of Oxford established in 1978 with funding from the Department of Health. The unit has expanded considerably in recent years and now has over 70 staff and students including epidemiologists, obstetricians, midwives, nurses, paediatricians, social scientists, public health physicians and information specialists. The mission of the NPEU is to produce methodological rigorous research evidence to improve the care provided to women and their families during pregnancy, childbirth, the newborn period and early childhood as well as promoting the effective use of resources by perinatal health services. Details at: www.npeu.ox.ac.uk

The TIMMS team at the University of Leicester was established in the late 1990's. TIMMS run an internationally renowned programme of research investigating the causes, consequences and management of specific aspects of the morbidity and mortality of the fetus, infant and child. Research findings are used to influence policy, education and clinical practice in reproductive, perinatal and paediatric medicine. Details at: http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/health-sciences/research/timms

Sands, the stillbirth and neonatal death charity, was established by bereaved parents in 1978. It is a national organisation, with over 100 regional support groups across the UK. Sands' core aims are: to support anyone affected by the death of a baby; to work in partnership with health professionals to improve the quality of care offered to bereaved families; and to promote research and changes in practice that could help to reduce the loss of babies' lives. Details at www.uk-sands.org

UKOSS is a joint research initiative between the National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit and the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, in collaboration with the Royal College of Midwives, the Obstetric Anaesthetists Association, the National Childbirth Trust, the Faculty of Public Health of the Royal College of Physicians. It is a UK-wide obstetric surveillance system to describe the epidemiology of a variety of uncommon disorders of pregnancy. This system lessens the burden on reporting clinicians of multiple requests for information from different sources. Details at www.npeu.ox.ac.uk/ukoss

Collaborators

Jenny Kurinczuk is Professor of Perinatal Epidemiology, Director of the National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford and an Honorary Consultant Public Health Physician. Her research includes the causes and consequences of neonatal encephalopathy, cerebral palsy and congenital anomalies (CAROBB), and the health outcomes for children born following assisted conception. She is also involved in leading national studies of near miss maternal morbidity (UKOSS) (UKNeS) and the evaluation of paediatric surgical interventions for congenital anomalies (BAPS-CASS). Visit the staff page for Jenny Kurinczuk

Marian Knight is NIHR Professor of Maternal and Child Population Health at the National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford and an Honorary Consultant Public Health Physician. Her research focuses on severe and rare complications of pregnancy and early childhood. She set up and has led the UK Obstetric Surveillance System (UKOSS) since its inception in 2005 and also leads the British Association of Paediatric Surgeons Congenital Anomalies Surveillance System (BAPS-CASS), conducting studies relating to the care of infants requiring early surgery. Visit the staff page for Marian Knight

Elizabeth Draper is Professor of Perinatal and Paediatric Epidemiology and with David Field leads the TIMMS team in the Department of Health Sciences at the University of Leicester. Her research interests include the epidemiology of neonatal and paediatric intensive care, the epidemiology and aetiology of infant mortality, congenital anomalies and prematurity, long term follow-up studies of premature births, congenital anomalies and after periods of critical care, and the international standardisation of perinatal data collection. View more details for Elizabeth Draper

David Field is Professor of Neonatal Medicine in the Department of Health Sciences at the University of Leicester and Honorary Consultant Neonatologist at University Hospitals Leicester. His research interests include the epidemiology of prematurity and preterm birth and trials in perinatal medicine. View more details for David Field

Charlotte Bevan is Senior Research and Prevention Advisor at Sands, the stillbirth and neonatal death charity, where she has worked for 9 years, developing an expertise in all aspects of perinatal loss. Her work involves stakeholder input with a range of organisations for the reduction of stillbirths and neonatal deaths. She co-authored the Preventing Babies’ Deaths: what needs to be done report published by Sands in 2012 and the new model post mortem consent form for babies, produced by Sands and endorsed by the Human Tissue Authority. She is herself a bereaved parent. Her first daughter Hope died in childbirth in 2001. View more details for Charlotte Bevan

Peter Brocklehurst is Professor of Women's Health and Director of the Institute for Women's Health, University College London, as well as Professor of Perinatal Epidemiology and Co-Director of the Policy Research Unit in Maternal Health and Care, at the University of Oxford. Peter is an obstetrician and clinical epidemiologist. His research expertise is in randomised controlled trials and observational epidemiology. His research interests include the evaluation of interventions in maternity and newborn care and the study of rare disorders of pregnancy. He has Chaired or been a member of several funding panels (including the DH Policy Research Programme Commissioning Board, NIHR HTA Commissioning Board, Wellbeing of Women Research Advisory Group), and is currently Chair of the MRC Methodology Research Programme panel. He is an NIHR Senior Investigator and Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences. View more details for Peter Brocklehurst

Ron Gray is a Consultant Clinical Epidemiologist at the National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford and an Honorary Consultant Public Health Physician. Ron is a psychiatrist and clinical epidemiologist. His research includes systematic reviewing, observational epidemiology, secondary data analysis (including HES and ISD data) and genetic epidemiology. His research areas include: impact of alcohol in pregnancy, preterm birth, infant mortality, perinatal mental health. Visit the staff page for Ron Gray

Dr Sara Kenyon is a Reader in Evidence Based Maternity Care in the Institute for Applied Health Research , University of Birmingham. She is a midwife by background and has extensive experience in the design, conduct and delivery of maternity research. She led the ORACLE Trial and Children Study and chaired the first NICE Intrapartum Care Guideline group (2007). View more details for Sara Kenyon

Bradley Manktelow is a Senior Research Fellow in Medical Statistics and has been working with the TIMMS group in the Department of Health Sciences at the University of Leicester since 1997. His particular research interests centre on the statistical methods used for the routine reporting of clinical outcomes and the statistical issues arising from research in neonatal and paediatric medicine. View more details for Bradley Manktelow

Jim Neilson is Professor of Obstetrics at the University of Liverpool and Honorary Consultant Obstetrician at Liverpool Women's Hospital and since 2008 has been NIHR Dean for Faculty Trainees. He has been Co-ordinating Editor of the NIHR-funded Cochrane Pregnancy & Childbirth Group since 1995. This is the leading producer worldwide of robust effectiveness evidence to guide maternity care and policy development. He has also been one of the two central obstetric assessors and chapter authors for the confidential enquiry into maternal death (CEMD) for the past five triennial reports. View more details for Jim Neilson

Maggie Redshaw is a Psychologist and Senior Social Scientist at the National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford. Her research includes women's experience of maternity care and the organisation of maternal and neonatal services. She is one of the Birthplace in England co-investigators and recent work includes analysis of staffing and organisation for the Neonatal Taskforce and a national maternity survey for the Department of Health. Visit the staff page for Maggie Redshaw

Janet Scott is Research Manager at Sands (the stillbirth and neonatal death charity). She has worked with Sands for 12 years, developing an expertise in all aspects of perinatal loss. Her work involves developing strategies across a range of disciplines for the reduction of stillbirths and neonatal deaths. She is author of 'Sands' Saving Babies Lives Report' and co-author on the Lancet's upcoming Stillbirth Series. She is an executive member of the NRHRN's Clinical Study Group for Stillbirths and chairs the International Stillbirth Association's communications group. View more details for Janet Scott

Dr Judy Shakespeare is a retired General Practitioner from Oxford. She began work with the maternal death enquiry in 2005. Since 2014 she has been the Royal College Clinical Champion in perinatal mental health.

Lucy Smith is a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Health Sciences at the University of Leicester. Her research interests include monitoring inequalities in health, measuring deprivation and socioeconomic status, understanding inequalities in cause-specific infant and neonatal mortality, and exploring the causes and consequences of preterm birth. View more details for Lucy Smith

Derek Tuffnell has been a Consultant in Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Bradford since 1994. He was a member of the NICE Guideline Development Groups for the Intrapartum Care guideline in 2007, the Hypertension in Pregnancy Guideline in 2010 and the review of Intrapartum Care in 2014. He is chair of the United Kingdom Obstetric Surveillance System Steering group which collects cases of rare disorders in Obstetric practice. He was a co-organiser of the RCOG Labour Ward management course for 10 years. He is on the Executive Group of the Born in Bradford - a longitudinal birth cohort of over 13000 women and babies and was involved in  establishing and recruiting the cohort.